2022-2023 Academic Catalog 
    
    Aug 17, 2022  
2022-2023 Academic Catalog

Course Descriptions


0100 Not offered for degree credit
1000 Primarily designed for undergraduate freshmen, these are basic introductory courses with no prerequisites except as designated.
2000 Primarily designed for undergraduate sophomores, these courses may require prerequisites or, if basic courses, may be taken after a year of college study.
3000 Primarily designed for undergraduate juniors, these courses anticipate the completion of lower-division studies and some have specific prerequisites.
4000 Primarily designed for undergraduate seniors, these are usually advanced courses for students completing undergraduate studies. Most 4000-level courses have prerequisites or anticipate the background of three years of college study.
5000 Considered introductory in graduate-level programs and may include some of the information covered in a similarly-titled undergraduate course; also open to undergraduate seniors and undergraduate juniors with at least a 3.0 GPA
6000 Considered more advanced and may include prerequisite requirements; also open to undergraduate seniors with at least a 3.0 GPA
7000 Considered more advanced and may include prerequisite requirements
9000 Doctoral-level courses open only to students accepted into a CIU doctoral degree program

Note: Courses numbered XXX 3950, 6950, or 9950 indicate faculty directed studies. In these studies, a student participates in a seminar or pursues research in an area of special interest under the direct supervision of a faculty member in that area.

 

Other Courses

  
  •  

    ASL 2110 - American Sign Language 1


    Credits: 3

    Introductory course to learning and understanding ASL. Includes receptive and expressive readiness activities; sign vocabulary; grammatical structure; receptive and expressive finger spelling; and deaf culture, values and rules of behavior of the deaf community.

    U
  
  •  

    ASL 2120 - American Sign Language 2


    Credits: 3

    Continues to develop the basic skills of classifiers, temporal sequencing, object identification through description and spatial agreement. Cultural values and behavioral roles of the deaf community are continued. Prerequisite: ASL 2110

    U
  
  •  

    BIO 2121 - General Biology II Laboratory


    Credits: 1

    Hands on laboratory exercises to demonstrate principles of biology to accompany BIO 2120. Corequisite: BIO 2120.

    U
  
  •  

    BIO 2130 - Human Anatomy & Physiology 1


    Credits: 3

    A study of the organization, structure and function of the human body with emphasis on cells, tissue, skin, bones, muscles, movement, brain, nerves and special senses. Physiological concepts including maintaining homeostasis will be discussed. Co-requisite: BIO 2131

    U
  
  •  

    BIO 2131 - Human Anatomy & Physiology 1 Lab


    Credits: 1

    Hands on laboratory exercises to demonstrate principles of human anatomy and physiology. The organization, structure, and function of cells, tissues will be explored. Dissection of preserved specimens will reinforce concepts regarding integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Corequisite: BIO 2130.

    U
  
  •  

    BIO 2135 - Human Anatomy & Physiology 2


    Credits: 3

    A study of the organization, structure and function of the human body with emphasis on endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Physiological concepts including maintaining homeostasis will be discussed. Prerequisite: BIO 2130 and BIO 2131. Corequisite: BIO 2136.

    U
  
  •  

    BIO 2136 - Human Anatomy & Physiology 2 Lab


    Credits: 1

    Hands on laboratory exercises and clinical assessments to demonstrate principles of human anatomy and physiology. The organization, structure, and function of the cardiovascular, endocrine, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive system will be explored with dissection of preserved specimens and hands on clinical analyses. Corequisite: BIO 2135.

    U
  
  •  

    BUS 2710 - Public Administration and Public Policy


    Credits: 3

    This course will examine and study the characteristics of the public organization and the principles of public administration, including organizational theory in the public sector, public sector management, public decision making, intergovernmental relations, public budgeting and finance, legal and ethical issues, and human resource and labor relations management in the public sector. Also covered will be public sector program evaluation, economic development, and the influence of politics in public decision making. Prerequisite: BUS1200 Business Finance

    U
  
  •  

    BUS 3410 - Principles of Real Estate


    Credits: 3

    Taught from a practical perspective, this course will provide an overview of the business and ethics of real estate and the practice as a broker or agent. Topics covered include legal descriptions of property, laws of real estate agency, real estate contracts, listing agreements, appraisals, regulations for agents and brokers, closing documents and closing procedures, and real estate mathematics. Also includes federal, state, and local laws relating to housing discrimination, credit discrimination, land use, and community reinvestment. (3) Prerequisite: BUS 4410.

    U
  
  •  

    BUS 3530 - Data Analytics for Business


    Credits: 3

    This course will introduce the Student to the concepts of data mining and data analysis, and the tools that are used to perform daily analytical functions in the business and sport world. You will gain an understanding of the data ecosystem and the fundamentals of data analysis and learn the skills required to effectively become a data-driven decisionmaker and communicate data effectively to stakeholders. (3) Prerequisite: MAT 1110 or MAT 2100.

    U
  
  •  

    BUS 3720 - Negotiation & Organizational Conflict Resolution


    Credits: 3

    The ability to negotiate effectively is critical for success in business as well as in ministry and everyday life settings. This course provides a comprehensive introduction to concepts in negotiation, interpersonal effectiveness, and organizational conflict resolution and will explore various types of negotiation including integrative, distributive, and iterations of these two extremes, as well as negotiation communication (face to face, virtual, verbal/non-verbal), emotion/perception (psychological intangibles), team/multiparty negotiations, and international negotiations and cultural differences, using case studies and role playing to help build skills and understanding of negotiations and organizational conflict. The student will learn to communicate more effectively, recognize and develop alternatives as well as overcome barriers, and utilize existing strength.

    U
  
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    BUS 4310 - Fundamentals of Investing


    Credits: 3

    This course offers an in-depth introduction to investments and investing, including investment analysis, portfolio management, and capital markets. The course will examine investment policies, types of securities, factors that influence price changes, timing purchases/sales, preparing investment programs to meet objectives, investment risk and return, and portfolio balancing, including an overview of the securities market and its behavior, sources of information about the various instruments traded, procedure of trades, and the relevant mechanics and techniques of the various U.S. and international markets. (3) Prerequisite: Junior or Senior status.

    U
  
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    BUS 4510 - Cybersecurity


    Credits: 3

    This course studies the contemporary cybersecurity threat facing organizations. Students apply various risk frameworks to provide structure to the decision-making needed to invest in resources for security controls and countermeasures. Multiple strategies are explored, including policies, procedures, training, technologies, and methodologies, including enterprise risk-management and financial decision-making used in other sectors of an organization. Topics include qualitative and quantitative risk analysis, audits, metrics, vulnerability assessments, capital budgeting, return on security investment, legal and regulatory compliance, and security best practices. This course will prepare students for leadership roles in assuring the security of an organizations operations. (3) Prerequisite: BUS 4500

    U
  
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    BUS 4520 - E-Business Management


    Credits: 3

    This course studies the issues and skills required for the management of an e-business enterprise. It includes the essential components necessary in conducting business over the internet, the development of an e-business plan and implementation strategy, e-commerce issues, Web design and content issues, customer relationship management, business intelligence issues, e-marketing concepts, enterprise resource management, supply-chain management, and the global dimensions of e-business. (3) Prerequisite: BUS 4500

    U
  
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    CMP 7100 - Comprehensive Exercise


    Credits: 1

    Under faculty supervision, you will design, implement, and evaluate learning goals in the context of an integrative research project and relevant literature related to the discipline of your concentration.

    Graduate
  
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    CNS 6915 - Internship Supervision


    Credits: 2

    This internship course is designed for students who are currently seeing clients and have not completed their required supervised internship hours and/or are currently not enrolled in any regular internship course. This course consists of two components: 1) A supervised practice of counseling under the direct clinical supervision of a site supervisor in an approved counseling internship setting, and 2) weekly seminars that include faculty instruction and small group case discussion. The clinical practice emphasis is on assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of various disorders and how they affect individuals, couples, and families. This course will utilize formal case presentations, student and instructor feedback, and didactic instruction. Case consultations will focus on enhancing students competencies in assessment and diagnostic interviewing, case conceptualization, cultural ontextualization, goal setting, treatment planning, counseling skills, and case management. This course may be repeated as needed and is offered based on student need. Internship site supervision and the university group supervision are required until internship hour requirements are met and the internship agreement is fulfilled. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory)Prerequisites: Only open to post-candidacy students in the MACNS program. Small group section enrollment is limited to 12 students. CNS 6912

    G
  
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    ENG 3820 - Advanced Writing


    Credits: 3

    In this course students will develop the essential skills necessary to produce a number of texts in various prose genres. Course assignments will sharpen students skills in using rhetorical language, and emphasize various stylistic choices appropriate for career opportunities in the arts, journalism, and publishing.

    U
  
  •  

    HIS 2400 - Ancient Rome: Empire of Civilizations


    Credits: 3

    This course will study the three key areas of ancient Rome: Beginnings and Monarchy, Republic and Expansion, Empire and Decline. In doing so, this course will provide an overview of the political, military, economic, and religious context of ancient Rome. Students will discuss Roman Law, architecture, and the mythos of the civilization and its influence on Western Civilization to this day. Figures who will be studied in-depth will include Hannibal, Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Augustus, Constantine, and Marcus Aurelius. It will also discuss the nature of the Eastern and Western Roman Empires up to the Fall of the Western Empire. Brief discussion concerning Constantinople will conclude the course.

    U
  
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    HIS 3300 - Ancient Greece: Foundation


    Credits: 3

    This course will provide background information on the ancient Greek culture, with a specific focus on Athens, from the rule of Law prescribed by Solon through to the Peloponnesian War. Macedon will be discussed from the rise of Philip II to the death of Alexander and the splintering of his empire. Brief discussion will be given of Pyrrhus and his war in Italy as a conclusion of the course. This course will include an exploration of the founding principles of liberty in contrast with empire and tyranny, the conflict between East and West, military tactics, Greek philosophy, religion, art, literature, and culture. Specifically, the course will analyse the Iliad and discuss sections of the Odyssey and the Theogony of Hesiod.

    U
  
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    HIS 3310 - European History (800-2000)


    Credits: 3

    This course will begin with the rise and reign of Charlemagne at his inauguration as Holy Roman Emperor, and follow the significant geopolitical, religious, and philosophical movements from the Carolingian Renaissance, through the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Enlightenment, exploring their effects on the continent of Europe and Great Britain. After an analysis of the French Revolution, it will transition to the modern era and look at major events such as colonial expansion, the rise of Germany, the Russian Revolution, First and Second World Wars, and the Cold War. It will also analyse key social and religious movements such as the sexual revolution, the rise and fall of Fundamentalism, and the impact of Liberalism on religion and politics in the US, and their impact in Europe.

    U
  
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    INT 6110 - Foundations of Internships


    Credits: 0

    This course is intended as a prerequisite for other INT courses. You will prepare for an internship by establishing a clear plan for learning and understanding the expectations, responsibilities, and activities associated with your internship experience. You must complete this course before you begin your internship. You do not need to secure an internship before enrolling in this course.

    Graduate
  
  •  

    INT 6220 - Bible Exposition Internship


    Credits: 3

    As the capstone experience for your MA in Bible Exposition degree, you will develop a plan for learning, arrange an internship site and field mentor, and engage in 120 hours of ministry activity focused on communicating biblical truth in a variety of contexts.

    Graduate
  
  •  

    LDR 3410 - Leadership Fundamentals for Women


    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to provide leadership fundamentals for women who are hungry to serve as God-honoring leaders and spiritual anchors in business and ministry. Through a study of women in the Bible, students will develop an ability to lead and mentor others from a Biblical perspective while learning to use their unique God-given personalities and voices to develop a successful approach to advancing the Kingdom of God. The course will focus on approaches to leadership, mentoring, and leadership essentials such as communication, group leadership, relationships, and conflict management as they relate to women in leadership. (3)

    U
  
  •  

    MUS 3410 - Digital Audio Workstation


    Credits: 3

    This course will introduce multi-tracking, editing, mixing and producing music using DAW software. The course will also explore the use of MIDI software instruments, samples, loops, etc. Students will create backing tracks for use in worship services, as well as completed songs ready to be published on internet music hosting and streaming websites. Computers for classroom use will be provided, but it would be beneficial if students have their own computers, DAW software, and recording interfaces.

    U
  
  •  

    MUS 3425 - Songwriting and Arranging


    Credits: 3

    This course will begin with a collaborative workshop approach to songwriting in which song ideas and prompts for lyrics and melodies will be developed in community. The class will learn to arrange those developed songs for a variety of worship ensembles in the context of contemporary worship music. We will explore song forms, harmonic progression, instrumentation and texture. Students will learn to notate their completed songs and arrangements using Finale notation software to create charts and lead sheets. Prerequisites: MUS 2310 and MUS 2210.

    U
  
  •  

    NUR 2000 - Nursing Candidacy


    Credits: 0

    This course serves as your application to enter the Nursing core courses. Meeting candidacy requirements does not guarantee a spot in the BSN program as space is limited. (0 semester hours; Pass/Fail)

    U
  
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    NUR 3110 - Pathophysiology


    Credits: 3

    The pathos of various diseases and pharmacologic classifications for treating patients across the lifespan are presented. Genomics as a therapeutic approach is studied. Appropriate monitoring of symptom severity and patient outcomes through the recognition and safe management of subtly changing symptom status is emphasized. A patient education project that incorporates deeper exploration of a selected body system and therapeutics is conducted. Evidence based practices and patient outcomes are analyzed through selected scenarios. Includes didactic instruction. Prerequisites: NUR 2000; Co-requisites: NUR 3120, NUR 3130, NUR 3410. (Letter grade; 3 semester hours) A grade of C+ or better must be earned in this course to apply toward the Nursing Major.

    U
  
  •  

    NUR 3120 - Health Assessment


    Credits: 4

    Using diverse unfolding case studies, students will conduct and document the comprehensive, holistic history and assessment of patients across the lifespan and with various physical presentations as an evaluation of care. Symptom severity serves as an indicator on the wellnessillness continuum across the lifespan, and an appropriate plan of care is created. Chronic and complex conditions are analyzed for the quality of outcome, and prevention and health promotion strategies are integrated into the nurses role. Includes didactic and skills lab instruction. Prerequisites: NUR 2000; Co-requisites: NUR 3110, NUR 3130, NUR 3410. (Letter grade; 4 semester hours) A grade of C+ or better must be earned in this course to apply toward the Nursing Major.

    U
  
  •  

    NUR 3130 - Nursing Fundamentals


    Credits: 6

    This course contains theory, simulation, and clinical components while focusing on nursing practice from a Biblical perspective. Students are introduced to the role of the professional nurse, the nursing process, quality, and safety as foundational to practice. Clinical reasoning and care of adults are emphasized. Fundamental skills, introduction to dosage calculation, and introduction to safe medication administration provide a foundation for more advanced study in professional practice. Includes didactic, skills/simulation lab, and clinical instruction. Prerequisites: NUR 2000; Co-requisites: NUR 3110, NUR 3120, NUR 3410. (Letter grade; 6 semester hours) A grade of C+ or better must be earned in this course to apply toward the Nursing Major.

    U
  
  •  

    NUR 3315 - Pharmacology in Nursing


    Credits: 4

    This theory course includes simulation and provides an introduction to the principles of pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacogenetics. Drug classifications, basic mechanisms of drug action and interactions, continuation of safe medication administration, continuation of dosage calculation, and patient teaching are addressed. Includes didactic and skills lab instruction. Prerequisites: NUR 2000, NUR 3120, NUR 3130, NUR 3110, NUR 3410; Co-requisites: NUR 3425, NUR 3415. (Letter grade; 4 semester hours) A grade of C+ or better must be earned in this course to apply toward the Nursing Major.

    U
  
  •  

    NUR 3410 - Adult Health Nursing I


    Credits: 6

    This course contains theory, simulation, and clinical components while focusing on the care of adult and geriatric patients and their families with common health conditions, both chronic and acute in nature. Explores growth and development from young adulthood through end of life as defined by the developmental stages of Erikson and Piaget. Providing compassionate and spiritual care from a Biblical worldview is emphasized while applying professional standards of practice. Students will focus on the use of the nursing process while caring for adults. Includes didactic, skills/simulation lab, and clinical instruction. Prerequisites: NUR 2000. Co-Requisites: NUR 3110, NUR 3120, NUR 3130. (Letter grade; 6 semester hours) A grade of C+ or better must be earned in this course to apply toward the Nursing Major.

    U
  
  •  

    NUR 3415 - Mental Health Nursing


    Credits: 5

    This course contains theory, simulation, and clinical components while emphasizing the use of therapeutic communication by the nurse using a Biblical framework in caring for patients with acute and chronic mental illness. Students will focus on the compassionate care of patients with mental health conditions throughout the lifespan while applying the nursing process. Includes didactic, skills/simulation lab, and clinical instruction. Prerequisites: NUR 2000, NUR 3120, NUR 3130, NUR 3110, NUR 3410; Co-requisites: NUR 3425, NUR 3315. (Letter grade; 5 semester hours) A grade of C+ or better must be earned in this course to apply toward the Nursing Major.

    U
  
  •  

    NUR 3425 - Child Health Nursing


    Credits: 6

    This course contains theory, simulation, and clinical components while focusing on nursing care of children and their families. Family dynamics, developmental stages, health assessment, effective communication, health promotion, risk reduction, and disease management specific to children are emphasized. Explores developmental stages from birth through adolescence as defined by the developmental stages of Erikson and Piaget. A Biblical worldview of traditional family values is a focus for students as they care for children and their families. Includes didactic, skills/simulation lab, and clinical instruction. Prerequisites: NUR 2000, NUR 3120, NUR 3130, NUR 3110, NUR 3410. Co-Requisites: NUR 3315, NUR 3415. (Letter grade; 6 semester hours) A grade of C+ or better must be earned in this course to apply toward the Nursing Major.

    U
  
  •  

    NUR 4415 - Adult Health Nursing II


    Credits: 6

    This course contains theory, simulation, and clinical components while building on knowledge gained in Adult Health Nursing I to care for adults and geriatric patients with complex health conditions. Interprofessional communication/collaboration, healthcare informatics, patient technology, ethical and legal issues are covered in this course. Students will apply the nursing process to adult acute and critical care patients. Includes didactic, skills/simulation lab, and clinical instruction. Prerequisites: NUR 2000, NUR 3120, NUR 3130, NUR 3110, NUR 3410, NUR 3425, NUR 3315, NUR 3415, NUR 4410, NUR 4510, NUR 4430, NUR 4420; Co-requisites: NUR 4425, NUR 4930. (Letter grade; 6 semester hours) A grade of C+ or better must be earned in this course to apply toward the Nursing Major.

    U
  
  •  

    NUR 4420 - Nursing Care for Vulnerable


    Credits: 3

    This course generates the growth mindset needed in the baccalaureate prepared registered nurse to minister through nursing care in multifaceted situations and adaptive environments as ministry. Concepts and theories i.e. servant leadership, loss, ethics, advocacy, funding sources and resources, rural and inner-city community, culture and ethnicity, family structure, disaster response, and mentoring, along with others are interwoven to reflect the complex nature of the nurse-patient (individual, family, community) relationship. The care needs of vulnerable populations i.e. those in long term care, the homeless, and those with substance disuse disorder are a special focus. The lens of a Biblical worldview is incorporated into the analysis. Includes didactic instruction. Prerequisite: NUR 2000, NUR 3120, NUR 3130, NUR 3110, NUR 3410, NUR 3425, NUR 3315, NUR 3415; Co-requisites: NUR 4410, NUR 4510, NUR 4430. (Letter grade; 3 semester hours) A grade of C+ or better must be earned in this course to apply toward the Nursing Major.

    U
  
  •  

    NUR 4425 - Leadership in Nursing


    Credits: 3

    Biblical truths regarding authority, power, love, and money are the cornerstone of this course. Strategies for effective communication and the organization and safe interprofessional delivery of quality, ethical care needed by multiple patients with varying levels of acuity are presented. Systems thinking is used to analyze operations and budgetary constraints. Mentoring and precepting skills are developed. Includes didactic instruction. Prerequisites: NUR 2000, NUR 3120, NUR 3130, NUR 3110, NUR 3410, NUR 3425, NUR 3315, NUR 3415, NUR 4410, NUR 4510, NUR 4430, NUR 4420; Co-requisites: NUR 4415, NUR 4930. (Letter grade; 3 semester hours) A grade of C+ or better must be earned in this course to apply toward the Nursing Major.

    U
  
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    NUR 4430 - Community/ Population Health


    Credits: 4

    Measures of community and population health and the nurses role in health promotion and disease prevention for families and diverse vulnerable populations across the lifespan in the community are explored. The determinants of health, surveillance of epidemiological data, interprofessional collaboration, sanctity of life, the dying process and salvation care, and the impact of faith on health are explored. Interviews of nurses and/or health leaders in various community settings are incorporated. Includes didactic, skills/simulation lab, and clinical instruction. Prerequisites: NUR 2000, NUR 3120, NUR 3130, NUR 3110, NUR 3410, NUR 3425, NUR 3315, NUR 3415; Co-requisites: NUR 4410, NUR 4510, NUR 4420. (Letter grade; 4 semester hours) A grade of C+ or better must be earned in this course to apply toward the Nursing Major.

    U
  
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    NUR 4510 - Research/ Evidence-Based Practice


    Credits: 3

    An overview of scholarly research and ethics needed within the profession are presented. Students will learn to promote quality and safety and enhance client outcomes through evidence-based practice. Includes didactic instruction. Prerequisite: NUR 2000, NUR 3120, NUR 3130, NUR 3110, NUR 3410, NUR 3425, NUR 3315, NUR 3415; Co-requisites: NUR 4410, NUR 4430, NUR 4420. (Letter grade; 3 semester hours) A grade of C+ or better must be earned in this course to apply toward the Nursing Major.

    U
  
  •  

    NUR 4930 - Capstone in Nursing & Systems Care


    Credits: 4

    Students reflect on the needs of the nursing profession as it relates to improving population health and their subsequent lifelong learning goals. Their professional development as a baccalaureate prepared registered nurse and the impact on the profession and an organizational system are explored though clinical experiences with a preceptor. The achievement of university and program outcomes are evaluated. Students lead a capstone project which is guided by current research evidence and which incorporates interprofessional collaboration and change management. Includes didactic and clinical instruction. Prerequisites: NUR 2000, NUR 3120, NUR 3130, NUR 3110, NUR 3410, NUR 3425, NUR 3315, NUR 3415, NUR 4410, NUR 4510, NUR 4430, NUR 4420; Co-requisites: NUR 4415, NUR 4425. (Letter grade; 4 semester hours) A grade of C+ or better must be earned in this course to apply toward the Nursing Major.

    U
  
  •  

    PTH 9000 - Comprehensive Knowledge Review


    Credits: 0

    You will demonstrate your familiarity with key foundational knowledge areas in the scholarship of your discipline. Your supervising professor will evaluate you in these areas on a tutorial basis during your second year of study.Prerequisites: PTH 9900.

    G
  
  •  

    RES 4800 - Research Thesis: Research & Writing


    Credits: 3

    The student will be tasked with identifying an area of research that they can devote an entire academic semester to studying. This will include focusing on a narrow area of interest, identifying sources for an approved bibliography, reading critical material, developing an outline for the thesis, and writing samples for critique in the first half of the semester, and then completing the thesis in the second half. Ideally, a presentation would be incorporated into the class, where students would participate in a viva voce in order to defend their argument. The final thesis will be submitted by the end of the semester. Prerequisite ENG 1111.

    U
  
  •  

    SCI 2888 - Earth Sciences Study Tour


    Credits: 3

    In this course you will learn about various environmental issues facing our nation and world, while asking yourself what role should Christians take in protecting this planet? Possible topics include sustainability (hunting, fishing or food production), the effect of pollution on marine ecosystems, human impacts on ecosystems, and the effects of global warming. While traveling through numerous small towns, we will experience the local culture of this beautiful state. As we hike and boat in and around beautiful glaciers, we will likely see whales, moose, bears and other wildlife in their natural habitat.

    U
  
  •  

    SPT 1000 - Professional Enrichment Seminar


    Credits: 0

    This Seminar course is a requirement for all Cook School of Business students majoring in Sport Management. The Seminar will engage students in relevant topics affecting all aspects of Sport and Sport-related careers, and includes presentations by athletes, coaches, sport administrators, and other professionals and practitioners engaged in the vocation of Sport Management. (0)

    U
  
  •  

    SPT 2120 - Athletics Administration


    Credits: 3

    This course will study the administrative skills required to be a successful and effective athletic administrator across diverse sport settings, including college, high school, youth, and club.

    U
  
  •  

    SPT 2220 - Biomechanics of Human Movement


    Credits: 3

    This course focuses on the development of techniques of human movement analysis from structural and functional points of view and incorporates principles of mechanics as they apply to the analysis of human motion. Examples will be drawn from joint movements and sport skills to illustrate these types of analyses.

    U
  
  •  

    SPT 2810 - Introduction to E-Sports


    Credits: 3

    This course introduces students to e-sports and the fundamentals of effective e-sports management. Students will explore financial, legal, ethical, marketing, and operational issues surrounding the e-sports industry and explore career opportunities in e-sports management. (3)

    U
  
  •  

    SPT 3220 - Exercise Physiology


    Credits: 3

    The course will study and examine the key theories, concepts, and scientific principles of human physiology and the adaptations that occur during exercise. Prerequisite: BIO2130.

    U
  
  •  

    THE 9000 - Comprehensive Knowledge Review


    Credits: 0

    You will demonstrate your familiarity with key foundational knowledge areas in the scholarship of your discipline. Your supervising professor will evaluate you in these areas on a tutorial basis during your second year of study.Prerequisite: THE 9900.

    G
  
  •  

    XXX xxxx - Concentration Course


    Credits: 3

    Graduate
  
  •  

    YOU 4110 - Foundations of Internship


    Credits: 0

    This course is designed to be the prerequisite course for YOU 4930 Youth Ministry Internship. You will prepare for your internship by establishing objectives and learning the expectations and responsibilities associated with your internship. You do not need to secure an internship before enrolling in this course.

    U
  
  •  

    YOU 4810 - Trending Topics in Youth Ministry


    Credits: 3

    A Trending Topics course will offer a variety of courses that address current developments and/or special-interest topics in the field of ministering to youth and families. (Trending Topics courses may be repeated for credit, as long as the content is different.)

    U

American Sign Language

  
  •  

    ASL 2110 - American Sign Language 1


    Credits: 3

    Introductory course to learning and understanding ASL. Includes receptive and expressive readiness activities; sign vocabulary; grammatical structure; receptive and expressive finger spelling; and deaf culture, values and rules of behavior of the deaf community.

    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    ASL 2120 - American Sign Language 2


    Credits: 3

    Continues to develop the basic skills of classifiers, temporal sequencing, object identification through description and spatial agreement. Cultural values and behavioral roles of the deaf community are continued.

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: ASL 2110 
    Undergraduate

Art

  
  •  

    ART 2110 - Art Appreciation


    Credits: 3

    This course introduces students to the fine arts in their various media and period styles, with the goal of developing students’ understanding and experience of the role of the arts in life. An ongoing focus on the relationship between art and the Bible will encourage students to develop a theology of art.

    Undergraduate

Bible

  
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    BIB 1005 - Old Testament Survey


    Credits: 3

    This course provides an overview of the background and content of the Old Testament, with an emphasis on beginning to prepare you to study and interpret the Bible on your own. Students learn about the content, authorship, date of writing, and important background issues for each Old Testament book. (3) Limited to online program students.

    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 1010 - New Testament Survey


    Credits: 3

    This course provides an overview of the background and content of the New Testament, with an emphasis on beginning to prepare you to study and interpret the Bible on your own. Students learn about the content, authorship, date of writing, and important background issues for each New Testament book. Limited to online program students.

    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 1116 - Old Testament Survey


    Credits: 3

    In this course, you will become familiar with the basic contents of each book of the Old Testament and the broad historical framework of Old Testament events. You will pay special attention to key passages and prominent themes of the Old Testament. You will read the Old Testament with a view to using it for spiritual formation and discipleship.

    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 1120 - New Testament Survey


    Credits: 3

    This course is an overview of the books of the New Testament and the historical circumstances surrounding these writings. You will focus on the background, content, message, and personal application of each book in the New Testament. You will also examine the process by which the New Testament canon was formed and the New Testament was transmitted through the history of the Church.

    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 2441 - Methods of Bible Study: Philippians


    Credits: 3

    An examination of the principles and procedures for observing, interpreting and applying the Bible, as well as various methods or approaches to studying the Bible. This investigation of Bible study methods will serve as a foundation for the study of the message and distinctive ideas of the book of Philippians.

    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 2648 - Be Faithful: I and II Timothy,Titus


    Credits: 3

    In this course, you will analyze the Pastoral Epistles with special focus on issues faced by the early church as well as the 21st century church.

    Undergraduate
  
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    BIB 3010 - Life of Christ


    Credits: 3

    This course provides you with insight into the life of Christ through study in the four Gospels. As you examine Jesus’ life and ministry, the goal is to discern examples and patterns you may imitate to experience authentic and transformative Christian living. Doing so will prepare you to follow Jesus more completely and to impact your circle of influence with His message. Topics include Christ’s life, historical and cultural context, teachings, and theology. Limited to online program students.

    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 3230 - Between the Testaments


    Credits: 3

    A survey of political, cultural, linguistic and religious developments after the writing of Malachi, viewed as divine preparation for the coming of Messiah and the explosion of the Christian movement. (3)

    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 3420 - Principles of Bible Interpretation


    Credits: 3

    This course will guide you through the hermeneutical principles basic to interpreting Scripture. Many of these principles are common to language and literature, while others apply uniquely to the Bible. All of them are based on the way in which the Bible interprets itself. You will begin to lay a foundation of cognitive understanding, with an emphasis on practice in applying the principles.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 1116  (or BIB 1114  or BIB 1115 ) and BIB 1120  for undergraduates; graduate students may take this as a graduate school prerequisite.
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 3421 - Principles of Biblical Exegesis and Exposition


    Credits: 3

    This course is an extension of the study done in BIB 3420 concerning principles for interpreting Scripture. This workshop course gives you the opportunity to apply hermeneutical principles by exegeting passages in the Bible and developing messages, lessons, and explanations which reflect the content, outline, and reasoning of the passage and are suitable for designated situations. Students may replace BIB 3421 with any upper division elective that requires them to use the skills learned in BIB 3420. This course serves as a biblical interpretation elective.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420  
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 3613 - Acts


    Credits: 3

    This course is a historical study of the continued ministry of the risen Christ by the Holy Spirit through the early Christian church as God’s instrument for witnessing to the Lord Jesus Christ. You will focus on New Testament principles and methods for evangelization and church growth, with attention being given to historical backgrounds and interpretive problems. This course may serve as a New Testament exegetical book study.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 3616 - Romans


    Credits: 3

    Within the framework of an exegetical study, you will focus on the New Testament’s most organized, thorough exposition of the Christian faith and its relation to human history and implications for Christian living. Giving special attention to the personal application of the message, you will apply principles of biblical interpretation to the study of this book.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 3820 - Bible for Teachers


    Credits: 3

    In this course, you will develop a philosophy of Bible teaching and learn to follow a preparation procedure that will ensure that the purpose for which Scripture was given will be accomplished in your own teaching. You will focus specifically on how to plan a Bible curriculum with courses of study, units, and daily lessons, following the pattern of biblical revelation and teaching the biblical material with integrity.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 3950 - Faculty Directed Study in Bible


    Credits: 3

    This is an independent study available to juniors and seniors by special arrangement with instructor. Consult with your academic advisor.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420  
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4117 - Wisdom Literature


    Credits: 3

    In this course, you will master the content and theology of the Old Testament Wisdom books (Job, Proverbs, and Ecclesiastes) by utilizing the exegetical tools you learned in BIB 3420. Emphases include: The unique purpose of each Wisdom book, the discovery of meaning, and the contemporary application of meaning. The instructor stresses the importance of literary analysis. This course serves as an Old Testament exegetical book study.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4133 - Prison Epistles


    Credits: 3

    This course is a detailed study of Paul’s Prison Epistles (Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, and Philemon), composed during Paul’s time in prison for preaching the gospel. This course will examine the historical setting, literary features, and theology of the Prison Epistles. Attention will be given to key texts and themes within these epistles as well as the broad contours of each of Paul’s letters.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4200 - Bible Backgrounds


    Credits: 3

    This course will introduce you to the resources and methodological principles for studying and applying the finds of Bible backgrounds as an integral part of the hermeneutical process. Attention will be given to both Old Testament (ancient Near Eastern) and the New Testament (Jewish and Greco-Roman) backgrounds. As you compare the history, cultures, and literature of the biblical world, you will discover both similarities and differences and will evaluate their impact and role in the exegesis of the biblical text.

    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4310 - Progress of Redemption


    Credits: 3

    In this course, you will explore God’s plan of redemption as it progressively unfolds in the Bible. You will trace the basic historical revelation in the Old and New Testaments to see what God is doing and by what method. You will consider the spoken revelations as you observe the progress of doctrine.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 1116  (or BIB 1114  or BIB 1115 ) and BIB 1120 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4321 - Old Testament Theology


    Credits: 3

    In this advanced study, you will explore the theological thought of the Old Testament. You will examine the major themes which give unity to the writings of the Old Testament. Special attention will be given to God’s salvation for Israel and the world, as well as to the interpretation of the Old Testament in the New Testament and its application in contemporary culture. (3)

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4325 - Studies in Biblical Theology


    Credits: 3

    In this advanced seminar, you will explore selected topics that focus upon a particular corpus of biblical texts or a particular theme articulated in scripture. Topics may vary from year to year, and the course may be repeated for credit if the topic of study differs.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4330 - New Testament Theology


    Credits: 3

    In this advanced study, you will explore the theological thought of the New Testament, trace the progression of thought beginning with Jesus, and seek to discover each writer’s distinctive contribution to the overall message of the New Testament. Special attention will be given to the gospel of the kingdom as proclaimed and applied by the various biblical authors. (3)

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420  
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4503 - Genesis


    Credits: 3

    In this course, you will master the content and theology of the book of Genesis by utilizing the exegetical tools you learned in BIB 3420. Emphases include: Creation, covenant and blessing, interpreting narrative, and contemporary application. The instructor stresses the literary approach to narrative. This course serves as an Old Testament exegetical book study.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4506 - Exodus


    Credits: 3

    This course is a detailed study of the book of Exodus in which you will make use of what you have learned concerning the principles and methods of proper biblical interpretation.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4517 - Ruth & Esther


    Credits: 3

    In this detailed study of the books of Ruth and Esther, you will examine each book’s historical and cultural setting, place in the canon, literary features, theological interpretation, and modern application. You will study the lives of these women of God and explore the crucial role each woman played in the biblical account of redemption.

    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4538 - Psalms


    Credits: 3

    In this course, you will master the content and theology of the book of Psalms by utilizing the exegetical tools you learned in BIB 3420. Emphases include: The different literary forms of Psalms, the understanding of the Psalter as a whole, and contemporary application. The instructor stresses the canonical approach to the book of Psalms. This course serves as an Old Testament exegetical book study.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4541 - Studies in Psalm and Prophets


    Credits: 3

    In this course, you will study various genres in the Psalms and Prophets, in particular passages where the biblical writers either engage God in dialogue or pour out their hearts to him. The goal is to analyze and to understand better the thoughts and feelings of those writers as they shared their experiences not only with God but with us through the pages of Scripture.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420  and PSY 2110 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4544 - Ecclesiastes


    Credits: 3

    In this course, you will master the content, interpretational issues, and basic scholarship on the Book of Ecclesiastes. You will utilize the exegetical tools learned in BIB 3420 - Principles of Bible Interpretation. Emphases include: the meaning of individual passages of the book, the message of the book as a whole, contemporary scholarship, and the application of meaning to our post-modern world.

    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4548 - Isaiah


    Credits: 3

    This course is a detailed study of the book of Isaiah in which you will make use of what you have learned concerning the principles and methods of proper biblical interpretation.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4551 - Jeremiah


    Credits: 3

    This course is a detailed study of the book of Jeremiah in which you will make use of what you have learned concerning the principles and methods of proper biblical interpretation.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4558 - Minor Prophets


    Credits: 3

    In this detailed study of the Minor Prophets, you will examine each book’s historical and cultural setting, place in the canon, literary features, theological interpretation, and modern application. You will study the message of each book and explore the crucial role each prophet played in the biblical account of redemption.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4601 - The Gospel of Matthew


    Credits: 3

    This course is a detailed study of the Gospel of Matthew, in which you will consider the historical, literary, and theological distinctives of the Gospel and make use of what you have learned concerning the principles and methods of proper biblical interpretation.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4606 - The Gospel of Mark


    Credits: 3

    This course is a detailed study of the book of Mark, in which you will make use of what you have learned concerning the principles and methods of proper biblical interpretation.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4607 - The Gospel of Luke


    Credits: 3

    This course is a detailed study of the Gospel of Luke, in which you will consider the historical, literary, and theological distinctives of the Gospel and make use of what you have learned concerning the principles and methods of proper biblical interpretation.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4610 - The Gospel of John


    Credits: 3

    In this course, you will study the life of Jesus as delineated by the apostle John with consideration given to the distinctive approach taken by John and an emphasis on the theological content of the book. Through this course you will be encouraged to make use of what you have learned concerning the principles and methods of proper biblical interpretation. This course serves as a New Testament exegetical book study.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4619 - I Corinthians


    Credits: 3

    In this detailed study of the book of 1 Corinthians, you will give special attention to the literary, historical, and theological aspects of this Pauline epistle. Attention will also be given to the position of this epistle in the wider context of Paul’s ministry among the Corinthians and his missionary endeavors as reflected in Acts. The significance of Paul’s teachings for our understanding of early Christianity and for our contemporary context will be considered. This course is designed to help you make use of what you have learned concerning the principles and methods of proper biblical interpretation.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4655 - Hebrews


    Credits: 3

    In this course, you will investigate the priority of the New Covenant over the Old as presented in the biblical letter, Hebrews. You will focus specifically on an inductive and hermeneutical approach, the relevancy of the letter’s teachings to Christian attitudes and lifestyles, and the book’s missiological implications. This course serves as a New Testament exegetical book study.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4679 - Revelation


    Credits: 3

    In this detailed study of the book of Revelation, you will give special attention to the literary, historical, and theological aspects of the final book of the New Testament. You will give special consideration to the contribution of Revelation to early Christian eschatology and Christology. This course is designed to help you make use of what you have learned concerning the principles and methods of proper biblical interpretation.

    Prerequisite(s): BIB 3420 
    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 4712 - Bible and Theology Senior Seminar


    Credits: 3

    This course is designed to give you the opportunity to integrate knowledge acquired in your previous study of biblical and theological subjects. Special emphasis will be placed on producing a summative paper on a focused topic chosen in consultation with the course instructor.

    Undergraduate
  
  •  

    BIB 5112 - Introduction to the Old Testament 1


    Credits: 3

    In this course, you will trace the structure, content, and purpose of the Old Testament Pentateuch and Historical books. You will identify key theological themes and relate the content of these books to contemporary Christian faith and practice.

    Graduate
  
  •  

    BIB 5113 - Introduction to the Old Testament 2


    Credits: 3

    In this course, you will trace the structure, content, and purpose of the Old Testament Poetic and Prophetic books. You will identify key theological themes and relate the content of these books to contemporary Christian faith and practice.

    Graduate
  
  •  

    BIB 5120 - Old Testament Survey


    Credits: 3

    This course provides you with a panoramic viewof the entire Old Testament. You will explore the content and context of Old testament booksin a selective way. Special emphasis will be given to understand the message of the Old Testament in the context of both the ancient culture and te biblicalcanon with a view to its significance for today.

    Graduate
  
  •  

    BIB 5121 - New Testament Survey


    Credits: 3

    This course provides you with a panoramic view of the entire New Testament. You will explore the content and context of New Testament books in a selective way. Special emphasis will be given to understand the message of the New Testament in the context of both ancient culture and the biblical canon with a view to its significance for today.

    Graduate
  
  •  

    BIB 5132 - Gospels: God’s Means of Providing Redemption


    Credits: 3

    This course will guide you through a chronological, synthetic study of the four gospel records, emphasizing the time, place, circumstances, and persons involved in the events of Jesus’ ministry. The gospel writers narrate the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ, God’s appointed Redeemer of the world, who fulfills the promises and prophecies of the Old Testament.

    Graduate
  
  •  

    BIB 5133 - Acts to Revelation: God’s People Proclaiming Redemption Globally


    Credits: 3

    In this course, you will study the introductory background, structure, and content of the New Testament books, Acts to Revelation, understood within their first-century life setting. The authors of Acts, the letters, and Revelation not only relate the advance of the Early Church in proclaiming redemption globally, but they also provide the contemporary church with normative missionary documents to guide it in fulfilling Christ’s commission.

    Graduate
  
  •  

    BIB 5135 - Introduction to the New Testament


    Credits: 3

    In this course, you will trace the structure, content, and purpose of the New Testament books from Matthew through Revelation. You will identify key theological themes and relate them to contemporary Christian faith and practice.

    Graduate
  
  •  

    BIB 5410 - Hermeneutics


    Credits: 3

    In this course, you will explore and defend hermeneutical principles and processes based on evangelical presuppositions of Scripture and authorial intended meaning. You will apply an exegetical method to interpret Old and New Testament passages from a variety of biblical genres and apply them to contemporary settings.

    Graduate
 

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